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Coleman, E. The CTM-3 and CTM-15. The Care Transitions Program. Http://www.caretransitions.org/ctm_main.asp. Accessed 7/9/14. We have created two versions of the CTM®. The CTM-15® is a comprehensive version designed for those programs that focus explicitly on measuring care transitions. Alternatively, the CTM-3® is a more concise measure (and a subset of the CTM-15®) designed for those programs that focus on care transitions either alone or in addition to other aspects of care and can only employ a limited number of items. Both measures have been rigorously developed and have been shown to predict return to the hospital and/or emergency department and discriminate among hospitals known to differ in performance in this area. Three question patient survey.

August 8, 2019

Care Transitions Measure (CTM-3 and CTM-15)

Coleman, E. The CTM-3 and CTM-15. The Care Transitions Program. Http://www.caretransitions.org/ctm_main.asp. Accessed 7/9/14. We have created two versions of the CTM®. The CTM-15® is a comprehensive version designed for those programs that focus explicitly on measuring care transitions. Alternatively, the CTM-3® is a more concise measure (and a subset of […]
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Coleman, E. The CTM-3 and CTM-15. The Care Transitions Program. Http://www.caretransitions.org/ctm_main.asp. Accessed 7/9/14. We have created two versions of the CTM®. The CTM-15® is a comprehensive version designed for those programs that focus explicitly on measuring care transitions. Alternatively, the CTM-3® is a more concise measure (and a subset of the CTM-15®) designed for those programs that focus on care transitions either alone or in addition to other aspects of care and can only employ a limited number of items. Both measures have been rigorously developed and have been shown to predict return to the hospital and/or emergency department and discriminate among hospitals known to differ in performance in this area. Three question patient survey.
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http://www.caretransitions.org/ctm_main.asp

August 7, 2019

St. Luke’s Hospital: Where Patients’ Home Care Needs Are Anticipated at Discharge

Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Improvement Stories. 2008. http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/ImprovementStories/StLukesHomeCareNeedsAnticipatedatDischarge.aspx. Accessed 8/13/14. For some patients, being discharged from the hospital is a mixed blessing. It can feel both great and scary to return home, especially for those who need to take on new and potentially confusing responsibilities for self-care. At St. Luke’s […]
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Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Improvement Stories. 2008. http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/ImprovementStories/StLukesHomeCareNeedsAnticipatedatDischarge.aspx. Accessed 8/13/14. For some patients, being discharged from the hospital is a mixed blessing. It can feel both great and scary to return home, especially for those who need to take on new and potentially confusing responsibilities for self-care. At St. Luke’s Hospital in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, part of the Iowa Health System, a program called Transitions Home is addressing these concerns for patients with heart failure. By providing self-management support for patients at home, the hospital is reducing its rate of readmissions for heart failure patients. The program includes a combination of patient-friendly written information along with a home visit from a nurse, a physician office visit, and follow-up telephone calls. There are also weekend classes on heart failure management and diet, designed to anticipate patients’ need for ongoing reinforcement and support.
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http://www.ihi.org/knowledge/Pages/ImprovementStories/StLukesHomeCareNeedsAnticipatedatDischarge.aspx

August 7, 2019

The New York Academy of Medicine: The Promise of Care Coordination

A major new report finds that care coordination programs can reduce hospitalizations and Medicare costs and improve the quality of care for chronically ill older adults—provided the programs: promote direct engagement of teams of primary care physicians, nurses and social workers; create close communication among all providers involved in a […]
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A major new report finds that care coordination programs can reduce hospitalizations and Medicare costs and improve the quality of care for chronically ill older adults—provided the programs: promote direct engagement of teams of primary care physicians, nurses and social workers; create close communication among all providers involved in a patient’s care; and empower patients to help manage their own care. Released at the 2009 Annual Conference of the American Society on Aging and the National Council on Aging, “The Promise of Care Coordination: Models that Decrease Hospitalizations and Improve Outcomes for Medicare Beneficiaries with Chronic Illnesses” can help policy-makers craft national health care reforms that will better serve older adults and their caregivers.
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http://www.nyam.org/news/press-releases/2009/3208.html

August 7, 2019

The University of Kansas Hospital Corporate Policy Manual. Subject: Medication Reconciliation.

The University of Kansas Hospital Corporate Policy Manual. Subject: Medication Reconciliation. Formulated 5/1/2007. Accessed 7/9/2014. http://www.learningace.com/doc/2126652/d79631db906484626d18f77f4d4945bd/medication-reconciliation-hospital-policy. This short Policy from the University of Kansas Hospital includes definitions, policy, and procedures.
The University of Kansas Hospital Corporate Policy Manual. Subject: Medication Reconciliation. Formulated 5/1/2007. Accessed 7/9/2014. http://www.learningace.com/doc/2126652/d79631db906484626d18f77f4d4945bd/medication-reconciliation-hospital-policy. This short Policy from the University of Kansas Hospital includes definitions, policy, and procedures.
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http://www.learningace.com/doc/2126652/d79631db906484626d18f77f4d4945bd/medication-reconciliation-hospital-policy

August 7, 2019

TJC Sentinel Event Alert: Using medication reconciliation to prevent errors

The Joint Commission recognizes that many patients may be too ill, injured, young, or disabled to actively participate in the medication reconciliation process. In addition, patients may need the assistance of another person (e.g., family member, significant other, surrogate decision maker) if they are overwhelmed in managing their condition, are […]
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The Joint Commission recognizes that many patients may be too ill, injured, young, or disabled to actively participate in the medication reconciliation process. In addition, patients may need the assistance of another person (e.g., family member, significant other, surrogate decision maker) if they are overwhelmed in managing their condition, are not proficient in speaking or reading English, or face health literacy challenges that might prevent them from understanding medication use directions. Therefore, the following addition should be included in the section titled "Joint Commission requirements and recommendations." Addendum to Sentinel Event Alert #35, Using medication reconciliation to prevent errors (#4) When the patient is unable to actively or fully participate in the medication reconciliation process and has requested assistance from another person(s) (e.g., family member, significant other, surrogate decision maker), involve the authorized person(s) in the medication reconciliation process. This involvement should occur at all interfaces of care, and on admission to and discharge from the facility.
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http://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/SEA_35.PDF

August 7, 2019

The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals

During 2009, the National Patient Safety Goals underwent an extensive review process. As a result, The Joint Commission has revised the NPSGs. The changes were made partly in response to concerns from the field about the resources needed to comply with NPSGs that have become more specific and detailed over […]
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During 2009, the National Patient Safety Goals underwent an extensive review process. As a result, The Joint Commission has revised the NPSGs. The changes were made partly in response to concerns from the field about the resources needed to comply with NPSGs that have become more specific and detailed over time. The revisions include clarifying and streamlining certain elements of performance, as well as deleting some requirements and moving others to the standards. The changes to the NPSGs reflect The Joint Commission’s continuing efforts to focus the NPSGs on those topics that are of highest priority to patient safety and quality care. Decreasing the number of NPSGs allows organizations to focus their efforts on the most important issues. Moving a requirement to the standards means that it is no longer necessary to “spotlight” the issue in the NPSGs. The improvements are similar to the Standards Improvement Initiative (SII), which the standards have undergone, and the goal of the improvements is to clarify language and ensure relevancy to the settings in which they apply. 2011 NPSG # 8: Accurately and completely reconcile medications across the continuum of care.
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http://www.jointcommission.org/standards_information/npsgs.aspx